A05-en

Why CST is highly recommended during Pregnancy and Post-Delivery

Why CST is highly recommended during Pregnancy and Post-Delivery

Mom-to-be and fetus

Having a baby should be the happiest time in a woman’s life, and for most women, childbirth and early years parenting do provide great joy and fulfillment. Yet, it is a fact that women are more at risk of experiencing physical and emotional difficulties during and following the birth of a baby than at any other time in their lives: Pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum period can create one of the most stressful and anxiety-producing life transitions a woman may ever experience.

During pregnancy, it is normal and common to experience pain and aches particularly over the back, neck and legs, due to hormonal changes and extra body weight. Pregnancy in itself can bring a lot of stress, and recent research shows that extreme stress during a woman’s first trimester can have a negative impact on the baby’s mental health. Severe life events during pregnancy are consistently associated with an elevated risk of low birth weight and prematurity. Chemicals released as part of the mother’s stress response may have an effect on the fetus’ developing brain. Other research has linked stress during pregnancy with pre-term delivery and low birth rate.

It is particularly valuable during child bearing, and after delivery, as the very gentle touch of CST relieves the pain and aches and discomfort (e.g. low back pain, gastric reflux…etc) associated with pregnancy. The deep releasing effect improves pelvic mobility for a timely and smooth delivery. Craniosacral therapy also holds an “open space” to relieve the stress that arises from emotional and physical trauma.

CST is a safe, chemical-free therapy for every woman. It is particularly valuable during child bearing, and after delivery, as the very gentle touch of CST relieves the pain and aches associated with pregnancy. The deep releasing effect improves pelvic mobility for a timely and smooth delivery. Craniosacral therapy also holds an “open space” to relieve the stress that arises from emotional and physical trauma. CST calms the nervous system for both mother and baby, as when the mother’s system is soothed and balanced during pregnancy, the baby gains tremendous benefits. CST is profoundly relaxing and enhances free movement of all the body’s fluids systems including blood, lymph and cerebrospinal fluid. This free movement of fluids optimizes the self-healing and immune system of the body for mother and her baby. With the very gentle touch of CST, the session is pleasantly calming and relaxing and with no side effects.

Postpartum

The time following birth can be a very stressful period for a new mother. After childbirth, women face not only physical stressors like perineal pain, torn tissues, backaches, and urinary tract problems, but also less visible emotional problems. Studies show the factors that trigger postpartum stress and problems include interrupted and insufficient sleep for the mother, breastfeeding problems, fears and anxieties about the baby’s health, and the sudden reduction of progesterone levels after childbirth.

Postpartum CST sessions are very important for a new mother as they ensure that she herself can be nurtured and “recharged” at a critical time when most of her own energy is devoted to nurturing her new baby. CST postpartum treatment focuses on structural realignment, as well as emotional release, which together relieve this stresses of this extraordinary period. With the deep, soft tissue work, CST facilitates healing, promotes postpartum recovery and prevents severe physical and emotional problems from developing at a later time.

References

Alehagen S, Wijma K, Lundberg U, Melin B, and Wijma B. 2001. Catecholamine and cortisol reaction to Childbirth. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 8(1): 50-65.

Flora, C. 2005. An Ordinary Trigger for the Baby Blues. Psychology Today 38(2): 21.

Graham JE, Lobel M, DeLuca RS. 2002. Anger after Childbirth: An Overlooked Reaction to Postpartum Stressors. Psychology of Women Quarterly, 26: 222-233.

Hall PL and Wittkowski A. 2006. An Exploration of Negative Thoughts as a Normal Phenomenon after Childbirth. Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health 51(5): 321-330.

Harris B. 1996. Hormonal Aspects of Depression. International Review of Psychiatry 8(1): 27-36.

Heh SS, Fu YY, and Chin YL. 2001. Postpartum Social Support Experience while “doing the month” in Taiwanese Women. J Nurs Res 9(3): 13-24.

Hopkins J, Marcus M, Campbell SB. 1984. Postpartum Depression: A Critical Review. Psychological Bulletin, 95: 498-515.

Hung CH. 2006. Correlates of First-Time Mothers’ Postpartum Stress. Kaohsiung Journal of Medical Science 22(10): 500-7.

Hung CH and Chung IL. 2001. The Effects of Postpartum Stress and Social Support on Postpartum Women’s Health Status. Journal Advanced Nursing, 36(5):676-84.

McLean M and Smith R 1999. Cortioctropin-releasing Hormone in Human Pregnancy and Parturition. Trends in Endocrinol Metab 10: 174-178.

O’Hara MW 1995. Postpartum Depression: Causes and Consequences. New York: Springer-Verlag.

Diego MA, Jones NA, Field T, Hernandez-Reif M, Schanberg S, Kuhn C, Gonzalez-Garcia A. Maternal Psychological Distress, Prenatal Cortisol, and Fetal Weight. Psychosomatic Medicine, September-October 2006.

Glynn LM, Schetter CD, Hobel CJ, Sandman CA. Pattern of Perceived Stress and Anxiety in Pregnancy Predicts Preterm Birth. Health Psychology, January 2008.

Khashan AS, Abel KM, McNamee R, Pedersen MG, Webb RT, Baker PN, Kenny LC, Mortensen PB. Higher Risk of Offspring Schizophrenia Following Antenatal Maternal Exposure to Severe Adverse Life Events. Archives of General Psychiatry, February 2008.